Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Preparing for Airborne School

  1. #1
    Paratrooper
    Rocket1972's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Lexington, SC
    Posts
    491

    Preparing for Airborne School

    Having gone through the course what are some things that you might tell prospective troopers to do in preparation for the course?

  2. #2
    Gee, it's been so long since I went through, but my kid went through a couple years ago:

    1) Get in shape - run, run, run. Build up with pushups and even today pullups (though I think they changed the requirement).

    2) Remember the five "Ps" Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance - get your ducks in order which leads to the third:

    3) Remember five minutes early is on time; on time is late; and late is unacceptable! (I hadn't thought about that in years - though it's in my DNA - then a couple weeks ago I heard it on two TV shows in the same week - evidently a writer heard it and they all copy off each other).

    4) Oh yes! In case I forgot, get in shape.
    Artillery lends dignity to what otherwise would be a vulgar brawl...

  3. #3
    Paratrooper Zimmy 2.0's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    265
    Run like hell. Run run run. More folks failed over running than anything else that I remember.

    Do lots of stretching. Sprained ankles, knees, and such took out most of the rest. Usually in slam dunk machine phase. I think it was really called the Sling Landing Trainer or something.

    If coming right out of basic, don’t use your new found freedom to be stupid out on the town.


    I am determined to sustain myself as long as possible & die like a soldier who never forgets what is due to his own honor & that of his country Victory or Death. William Barrett Travis.

    Boldly going nowhere. Zimmy

  4. #4
    You have two ears, two eyes, and one mouth. Nuff said.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    A-3-505 PIR (96-98)
    B-2-121 INF (Iraq 05)
    B-1-118 INF (Afghanistan 07)

  5. #5
    Paratrooper JP43's Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Tower Hill, Il
    Posts
    9
    Be prepared to get the shit scared out of you!!!!!. Best advise I got, oh yeah, enjoy it while its happening

  6. #6
    Paratrooper Sgt Rich's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Santa Maria, Calif.
    Posts
    15
    When I was in AIT at Ft Knox I took advantage of the gym and worked out on a Universal Machine. I set the incline board on the highest position and did a lot sit-ups. I hated leg lifts in Airborne training and doing sit-ups is the best way to prepare. As for running; I always felt like it was more jogging in-step since being tall I was always in the back of the formation. It didn't work out to well for the short guys to have us tall guys up front in formation.

  7. #7
    Paratrooper Zimmy 2.0's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    265
    I don’t remember Airborne school being all that physically challenging. I went right after Infantry OSUT so it wasn’t a big deal. I’d been used to suffering for months by then and was pretty smoke proof at that point.

    I do remember that a lot of folks were weak though. Especially the senior officers and riggers. I remember wondering if they even ran in rigger AIT.

    I was more worried about my general uncoordinated manner getting me recycled into a permanent life of Sling Landings or Towers.


    I am determined to sustain myself as long as possible & die like a soldier who never forgets what is due to his own honor & that of his country Victory or Death. William Barrett Travis.

    Boldly going nowhere. Zimmy

  8. #8
    Paratrooper Standing Ready's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    532
    I can remember laughing Airborne School off after OSUT. Almost like the PT was a joke after Infantry School. And Infantry School was a vacation compared to the first freshman semester and hell week in the Corps of Cadets at Texas A&M University.

    The PLF training was hard for me to master. I never could get that down perfect.

    A lot of non Infantry types really suffered. There was a Marine Major who couldn't master the Airborne Shuffle and fell behind in all the runs. Force Recon Marines told me they would never salute that dude again. The poor bastard may have been just super old; like 28 or something.

    It seemed like the baby seals were the weakest of all. Possibly from all the Hiding In A Cave And Drinking Your Own Pee training they must endure.

    I vaguely remember any Air Force guys there. It wasn't until I met the TACP, CCT, and PJ types that I realized Air Force wasn't full of Nerds and beautiful women.

    As a kid, training for running cross country barefooted, digging ditches working for my dad, and and shooting everything that moved with a .22 rifle prepared me enough that I never suffered through any training at all.

    So 1. Get a physically demanding job growing up 2. Go U.S. Army 11B or alternative lifestyle service equivalent and 3. Have a well deserved vacation at Airborne School.

    People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf

  9. #9
    Paratrooper zanshin's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    The Middle of the Middle
    Posts
    30
    I thought Jump School was gonna kick my ass. I was wrong. I came right out of INF AIT at Tigerland, "Home of the Combat Infantryman for Vietnam" Ft. Polk. I was already in pretty damn good shape for a skinny kid by then, but twisted my ankle really bad the last week of AIT. A TAC NCO told me to buy a brand new pair of jump boots, lace them tight and try not to be seen limping. That worked.

    While I was in ABN School I bought a Gerber folding knife at Ranger Joes the first weekend as a present for my brother, and was goofing around with it in the old wooden barracks. It closed on my hand and cut like a razor clear to my knucklebone on my little finger. Pulling those riser slips on training devices with that hurt like a mofo, so don't do that.

    It was the first time we didn't have to wear starched fatigue duty uniforms every day. That was a good thing, the first day it was cold (March) and they had us take off our t-shirts, put our fatigue shirts back on for the run. Those damn stiff-as-cardboard starched shirt pockets rubbed my bare cold nipples raw til they bled. I washed my fatigues in the barracks that night so it wouldn't happen again. No one probably has that problem anymore.

    My student company commander, CPT Scott, was a guy a lot of folks have heard of by now... he was a totally cool cat to have in charge.

    CPT Leonard B Scott III.jpg

    I can't recall that we had any Marines in our training company, but we did have 3 AF PJs. Those guys were in the best shape of anyone in the unit, and were always joking around, totally relaxed about everything; nothing bothered them at all. Of course, they were E-3s like some of us but we'd been in the Army for 17 weeks, they'd probably been in the Air Force for 5 years to be that rank.
    Last edited by zanshin; 11-21-2017 at 02:47 PM.

  10. #10
    Paratrooper Fish's Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    153
    Jump school would would have like a walk in the park had I gone after climbing the Central Highlands.

    I was at Benning for the 2016 Herd reunion and talking to one troop who was hanging around the towers had this to say when I asked what the hell was he doing here. I was informed he had failed his PT and was being recycled for the third time so I said WTF over.

    One of the black hats told me and a buddy of mine that they could not even drop them anymore.

    Things have changed since 1967.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •